Wolfram: Rowans clubs and organizations to help students’ well-being

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If you are a student with disabilities (visible or not), there are many people on campus whose goal is to help you succeed during your time here at Rowan. While some may seem obvious yet important, there are others, though, that may be new to you.

The Wellness Center, located in Winans Hall, offers a variety of services to all current students. They handle illness and injury visits, mental health services, as well as alcohol and drug treatment. 

They also offer several groups to students during the week, including Stress & Anxiety Student Support on Mondays, Defense Against the Dark Thoughts on Tuesdays and (my personal favorite) Paws for a Break on certain days throughout the academic year. These events and more can be found in the Rowan Announcer or by calling (856) 256-4333.

The Academic Success Center is another important resource. In addition to helping students with their accommodations, they also offer workshops designed to provide students with the skills they need to succeed in college and beyond. 

These are part of a larger effort called the Brown Bag Series, with the next event, P Soup, taking place on Feb. 19. Moreover, the Academic Success Center offers a mentorship program for new students who would like more guidance and support throughout their first year at Rowan.

In addition to the Wellness and Academic Success centers, there are several clubs and student organizations specifically geared toward students with a variety of disabilities.

The Hidden Disabilities Alliance is a student-run organization that provides a community for students with invisible disabilities to be seen and to feel included in their college experience. However, it is also open to students who do not have hidden disabilities. If you are a friend or want to learn more about the disabled community here at Rowan, you would also be welcomed. According to ProfLink, this group meets on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in the Savitz Atrium located on the third floor.

Additionally, The College Diabetes Network at Rowan University offers a space for students with diabetes to improve both their student experience and quality of life through their programs. This group is part of a larger, nationwide organization, so you would belong to something much bigger than yourself that could help connect you to people with similar experiences. According to ProfLink, this organization meets on Tuesdays at 8 p.m. in Savitz Hall.

This is just a brief overview of the various resources and organizations that exist for all students, whether they are disabled or a friend to the disabled community. I’ve personally been to most of the programs mentioned here, and I can assure you that they are worth your time.

I can tell you that they definitely have benefited me during my time here and they will likely help you too. 

If you would like more information on any of the programs or offices mentioned in this column, I would encourage you to look on your Rowan Announcer and ProfLink for their contact information.

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